Announcements Galore, Part 2

In addition to our updated leadership board, times and locations for summer practices have also been posted. Please see the practice sessions page for a more detailed description of requirements for participation.

Monday/Thursday: Rancho Park Archery Range, 7-10:00 PM

Sunday: Pasadena Roving Archers Range, 10:00 AM-1:00 PM

There is no on-campus practice for the summer schedule, but workshops for various aspects of the sport, such as grip-building, may be held. In order to participate in practice and/or workshops, you must consult with club president Dan Kwasniewski and pay summer dues before you receive clearance to join.

Announcements Galore, Part 1

To say that the past month or so has brought with it a plethora of updates for Trojan Archery would be a vast understatement, dear readers.

To start, Trojan Archery has elected a brand-new Executive Board for the 2018-2019 school year, featuring a diverse mix of returning archers as well as newer, though certainly eager, faces. (Apparently the pull to join the dark side was particularly powerful this year). The current roster stands as follows:

Club President- Dan Kwasniewski

Vice President/Equipment Manager: Hei Leong

Barebow Captain: Alexandra Aloia

Olympic Recurve Captain: Bibek Samanta

Secretary: Grace O’Rourke

Treasurer: Laurel Paxton

Education Director: Huy Phan

Media & Communications Committee: Brandon Chung (Head), Justin Cheng, Caesar (Mingyu) Cui

Social Events: Simon Trinh (Head), Henry Connor, Leigh Sun

For a more complete profile of the E-Board, please visit the Leadership page.

 

And Two Rose From the Ashes

It has been a busy month for Trojan Archery, dearest readers.

Following on the heels of the National Indoor Championships we have been swamped with all sorts of new preparation. The most pressing of which was preparing ourselves for outdoor competition. For those unfamiliar with the shooting formats, all of the competitions mentioned in our posts so far were “indoor” competition which are shot at 18 meters (~20 yards). For the remainder of the season, all of our competitions, and for that matter most of the competition hosted by official entities in the archery world, will be “outdoor” and or “field” competitions. Besides from literally moving all of the shooting outdoors, the the distances at which archers shoot from will now range anywhere from 30 to 70 meters (a little over 75 yards). For us, this means heavily ramping up our bow poundage and getting used to shooting in outdoor conditions.

All of this hard work culminated for our competitive team members at the Western Regional Outdoor Collegiate Championships. Overall this was a learning experience for our team as this was the largest contingent we have sent to an outdoor competition in quite a few years. That is not to say that we did not have some outstanding archers within our ranks.

We would like to recognize George Park and Chanuwas (New) Aswamenakul for their great performance at Western Regional. This was their first time at outdoor competitions and they led our team in scores during the qualification rounds, placing in the top half and top third respectively in their division. Additionally, we would like to give a HUGE shoutout and congratulation to Jacob Broussard, our breakout compound shooter, for placing third in men’s qualifier, second in men’s elimination, and made the men’s All West compound team! Check below for pictures of our team from the competition, Jacob’s sweet, sweet medals, and an unintentional three-man horse ride.

 

West Regional marks the end of the competition season for most of our archers. However, our recurve Captain, Max Zade, will be going to the National Outdoor Collegiate Championship in May. We wish you the best of luck, Max.

Until next time, fellow Trojans, shoot on!

Everything’s Coming Up Peanut Butter

This past weekend we here at Trojan Archery sent a whopping 20 archers to the USA Archery 2018 Indoor National Championship. As strong as our team has been this season, we went on to break all expectations that we have set for ourselves. Though there were no team rating this time around, we had 12 archers who broke their personal bests (lovingly referred to as PB by our captains); some even breaking their PB multiple times! In addition to this, our compound team made a very strong debut for the season and we are excited to see their performance for the rest of the season. Check out the pictures from the tournament below; you’ll have to excuse the dead eyes in some of the photos, 8AM shooting time does no one justice.

 

National Indoor also officially marks the end of our team’s indoor season. As outdoor season involves shooting across significantly longer distances, this marks the end of the competitive seasons for many of our team members. To those who will not be continuing into the outdoor leg of the season, congratulation on your overwhelmingly positive indoor season, rest up, and train for next season. To those who are slated to compete in our outdoor competition, good luck and keep up your training!

Until next time, fellow Trojans: shoot on!


 

P.S. For those who have been inquiring about our “So You Want to Be an Archer” series, we had to to put it on hold for indoor season. We will resume adding posts to that series in the near future as our team members return to range for summer training.

Shoot Your Hearts Out

Hello, fellow Trojans!

First and foremost, let us at TrojanArchery.com apologize for our recent lack of activities and post. It’s not because we did nothing for two weeks–let’s be honest that’s a really long time to be mourning our lack of Valentine’s Day plan. Turns out our webmaster went full nerd mode to prepare for a science conference that he is currently attending. He sends his sincerest apologies.

Secondly, on a happier and less nerdy note, we are proud to announce that the First Annual (Potentially Semesterly?) Trojan Fundraiser 600 Round was a huge success. We had a great turn out that actually overflowed our original number of spots. Thankfully the administrative team of the Pasadena Roving Archery Range was able to help us adapt and accommodate the extra archers. On top of it all, some of our own competitive members placed in the tournament; shout out Laurel Paxton, Alex Aloia, Rob Campbell, and Henry Connor for the outstanding performance in their division. The overall result spread can be found here. All in all this is a great start to a new fundraising tradition for our club. Many thanks to those in the community who participated and all of the volunteers, both from the Trojan family as well as those of the PRA, for contributing their time and effort to our cause.

Finally, we would like to proudly announce a new addition to the Trojan Archery leadership: Rob Campbell has joined the dark cabal we call the Executive Board! He will be taking on the role of team captain for our barebow division. This marks the first time that we have ever had a formal barebow team headed by a captain. We are very excited to have Rob amongst the rank of our leadership and look forward to his fatherly rallying of the barebow team. Tic-tac-toe! Tic-tac-toe!

Until next time fellow Trojans, shoot on!

P.S. We also would like to wish you a belated Valentine’s Day and a Happy Lunar New Year. We’d make a post about it, but it’s not an official University holiday. So in lieu of an actual holiday post, we offer you a small glimpse into the aftermath of Valentine’s Day in a small town called Night Vale.

So You Want to be a (Barebow) Archer: Instincts, Gap, and String Walking

A common quandary we here at Trojan Archery encounters when teaching beginners–who all are introduced to archery through the barebow style–is how to teach them to aim. For shorter distances, the concept of “instinctive” aiming is straightforward; what you’re looking at is usually what you hit. However for longer distances, and especially with elevation changes akin to those in a field round, the answer of “instinctive” becomes a rather useless one.
Though some archers do develop the necessary instinct to aim across a wide range of distances and terrains, we find it more useful to formalize the less “mystical” aiming techniques used by barebow archers: gap aiming and string walking. We present below a short article written by our barebow Captain, Rob Campbell, on the topic of gap aiming and string walking.

 

Disclaimer: This information is only based on my limited knowledge and research acquired but I believe it all to be true. If anyone has any suggestions for more accurate information, please let me know.

There are three main types of barebow shooting in my opinion (there are many more but I think these are the main groups that can contain different subsection).

1. Gap method: the gap method uses a technique that I think every barebow archer starts with if you use the arrow tip to aim. When I aim at a target, I am aiming with the tip of my arrow at the ground and the gap that I create helps me hit the target.

2. Instinctive shooting: This method is sort of the ‘mystical’ way to shoot. It is said by many archers to take many years to develop and you only use your ‘instincts’ to hit the desired target.

3. String Walking: This method is for barebow archers that want to shoot point on. That means you use the tip of your arrow to aim directly in the middle of the target. By moving your finger tab down the string, you are creating the gap on your string rather than using your arrow as in the gap method.

In this message, I would like to explain a little about the String Walking method. String walking, when used in conjunction with a finely tuned plunger can allow the archer to put the tip of the arrow exactly on the target. By adjusting the position of the tab in a specific place on the bowstring, you move the nock of the arrow closer to your eye (you can also move it farther away from your eye for farther distances but that is another message). If you currently use the three-finger-under method, you are already ahead of the game. If you are using split finger, you will have to get used to closing your fingers and moving them under the nock.

The process begins with the right type of finger tab. You need to have a three-under tab with notches or stitches. The next step is data collection. By shooting at targets with various lengths you can figure out which specific stitch in your finger tab to adjust to. When you count down the stitches, you simply put your thumb on the stitch and move the tab down the string to the desired position. You will notice that the nock of the arrow moves closer to your eye. This will give you better point-on target accuracy that can eventually rival a sight using archer. As the distances of the target get shorter, the position away from the nock gets larger.

To test for left/right accuracy, you need to use and tune the plunger. First, shoot five arrows at a specific distance. If the arrows are drifting to the right, tighten the plunger ¼ turn. Re-check and adjust accordingly. If the arrows are in the target at an angle, the spring tensions must be adjusted. If the arrow is going in an arc to the left or the right with distance, the plunger position needs to be adjusted.

By tuning the plunger to perfection and learning the practice of string walking, we can bring home much more hardware in the competitions to come! To use this method, all you need is a three-finger-under tab with stitching and the time to practice.

Let’s do this!
SHOOT ON!

Until next time, fellow Trojans, shoot on!